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Geneva Academy was founded in 1796 when Geneva was just a small frontier settlement. On May 3, 1796, a special meeting was held, as recorded in town of Seneca records, and three commissioners were chosen to receive the moneys granted by the state for the "use of schools." On January 30, 1807, twenty-three "freeholders" of Geneva petitioned the Regents of the State of New York for the incorporation of Geneva Academy. It was called by trustee James Rees to announce that Trinity Church in New York City had bequeathed an endowment of 0 per annum to the school, specifically for the support of an academy at Fairfield, New York.It is believed to be the first school formed in Geneva. The petition document is the oldest extant document in which the academy is mentioned by name, as follows: "Your petitioners beg leave further to represent that the real estate belonging to their Academy consists of a lot of land fronting the public square in the said village of Geneva, on which they have erected a building twenty-five feet by thirty-eight feet, and one and a half stories high, and that they have for upwards of two years past employed a gentleman of abilities, regularly graduated at Princeton College, who, together with an assistant, has the superintendence of upwards of sixty students." He was engaged to teach the respective branches of literature on the following terms: First Class-Reading, writing and arithmetic, 2 dollars 25 cents per quarter; Second Class-English grammar, book-keeping, geography and mathematics, including geometry, mensuration, algebra, surveying, navigation and astronomy, 4 dollars per quarter; and Third Class-The Latin, Greek and Hebrew languages, 5 dollars per quarter. One of the conditions of the grant from Trinity Church was that the residents of Geneva should erect a building for the accommodation of the "Branch Theological School." Another stipulation required that the site location be chosen by Bishop Hobart.Roughly following this plan, Geneva Academy reopened as Geneva College in 1822 with conditional grant funds made available from Trinity Church in New York City.

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Hobart College (men) and William Smith College (women) are both liberal arts colleges offering the degrees of bachelor of arts, bachelor of science, and master of arts in teaching. 1 by the Princeton Review for having the "most popular study abroad program" in higher education, as well as 18th in having the happiest students and 18th in best student-rated professors.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges, private colleges located in Geneva, New York, began on the western frontier as the Geneva Academy.

In an era when the prevailing conventional wisdom was that no woman could withstand the intellectual and emotional rigors of a medical education, Elizabeth Blackwell, (1821–1910) applied to and was rejected – or simply ignored – by 29 medical schools before being admitted in 1847 to the Medical Institution of Geneva College. Griffith, who were assistant secretary of state and builder of the first national railroad across the Mississippi River, respectively; and Charles J.

The medical faculty, largely opposed to her admission but seemingly unwilling to take responsibility for the decision, decided to submit the matter to a vote of the students. The school was known as Geneva College until 1852, when it was renamed in memory of its most forceful advocate and founder, Bishop Hobart, to Hobart Free College. Hobart College of the 19th century was the first American institution of higher learning to establish a three-year "English Course" of study to educate young men destined for such practical occupations as "journalism, agriculture, merchandise, mechanism, and manufacturing", while at the same time maintaining a traditional four-year "classical course" for those intending to enter "the learned professions." It also was the first college in America to have a Dean of the College. Folger, Class of 1836, a United States Secretary of the Treasury in the 1880s.

Smith, however, was intent on establishing a coordinate, nonsectarian women's college, which, when realized, coincidentally gave Hobart access to new facilities and professors.