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Baker afterwards kept an hotel in Baker Street, known as the Royal Oak. On account of distress caused by floods the Governor curtailed the sale of rum during the year 1798. He next appears on the scene as a brewer, receiving permission on 11th May, 1806, to sell at a shilling a gallon, and small beer sixpence.

The old Government House was also built about this time as a residence for Lieutenant Edward Abbott, commander of the troops for the N. About the year 1800 there appeared on the Hawkesbury a settler named Andrew Thompson, who played a leading part in the development of the district up to the time of his death in 1810. His brewery was situated on the bank of the South Creek. Hughes (who was the schoolmaster at Richmond, and formerly at Windsor), R.

The Articles have been the subject of considerable correspondence, both in the local paper and direct to the author. Henry Selkirk, of the Lands Department, and for several years a kindly neighbour in Killara. The following year many more families were settled, and as the natives were troublesome, some troops from the N. It is of interest to note that Lieutenant Grose was the son of Captain Grose, concerning whose peregrinations through Scotland the poet Burns wrote: A chiel's amang you takin' notes, And faith he'll print it. The Grants from the year 1800 to 1804 were as follows—Thomas Hobby, William Bates, Lydia Austen, Charles Marsden (900 acres), William Ezzy (130 acres), Henry Cox, and Andrew Thompson. The bat of missing books is given, which includes such standard works as Milton, Burns, Sterne, Thomson, Hervey and others. The foundation stones of this church were laid by Rev.

By this means valuable revisions and additions have been made. "I have read the articles on the 'Early Days of Windsor', by the Rev. "As a native of Windsor, with a clear recollection of the past seventy-five years, I may say that the author has spared no pains to make his statements accurate and reliable. The earliest Hawkesbury Crown grants included those to Samuel Wilcox, John Brindley, William Bond, John Ruffler, Alexander Wilson, and Whaelen. Thomas Westmore and William Anderson, James Ruse, Ann Blady and Joseph Smallwood, in 1797. These may be easily located on the map of the Parish of St. The grants for the same period made near Pitt Town were:—Messrs. A Government order, dated 8th April, 1804, ordered that all boats trading on the Hawkesbury River should be numbered and registered by Andrew Thompson, head constable, otherwise they would be confiscated.

"Said report on return is in the first instance to be made to Wm. Roads were formed, and a new bridge built over the South Creek. A large collection of newspaper cuttings has been got together in book form by Mr. Padley ("Yeldap"), and can be found in the Sydney Public Library, catalogue number 994 over 7. In Macquarie's time there was no street between the gaol and the Court House. There was another course at Wilberforce, to which visitors came from all parts of the colony. In 1848 it was 1,679, and in 1891 the figures were 2,026. The population of Windsor according to the 1911 census was 1,674. Andrew Thompson, however, did not live long to enjoy the honours which were thus thrust upon him, for he died at his residence, Green Hills, on 22nd October, 1810, and was buried on 26th October, in a vault, in the new cemetery. His effects were sold by auction on 19th January, 1811, by John Howe, his successor in the office of local auctioneer. A number of gentlemen followed as mourners, and a long train, composed principally of the inhabitants of the settlement, followed in succession." The following is a copy of the entry of his death in the register of the Parish Church of Hawkesbury:—"Entry No. Andrew Thompson, Esq., of this Parish, came to the colony in the ship Pitt, in the year of our Lord, 1792.